Smoke - Free Philly

  Why smoke-free spaces?   o   Smoke-free spaces protect people from secondhand smoke exposure. There is no safe level of secondhand smoke.  Youth, those with serious medical issues, and the elderly are particularly vulnerable  o   Smoke-free spaces motivate people to quit smoking  o   Smoke-free spaces help smokers reduce their consumption of tobacco  o   Smoke-free spaces help prevent youth from starting to smoke  o   Smoke-free space reduce tobacco-related litter and the risk of fire  o   Smoke-free events are increasingly the norm and expectation at many events in various communities  o   LGBTQ events can be smoke-free and still be welcoming and inclusive.  Many attendees can include youth, families, former smokers, or people in recovery who may prefer for events to be smoke-free  o   Smoke-free spaces acknowledge that tobacco-use has a devastating impact on the wellbeing of LGBTQ people, people of color, and our communities at the intersection of those identities. The Tobacco Industry is no ally to LGBTQ communities and communities of color, and has targeted our communities with tobacco products and strategic marketing for decades  o   In Philadelphia, many public indoor and outdoor spaces are already smoke-free, including many bars, restaurants, workplaces, parks, rec centers, colleges/universities, multi-unit housing, etc.  o   LGBTQ people smoke at rates over 50% higher than non-LGBTQ people, and 16.5% of African Americans in the United States smoke  o   Philadelphia has the highest rate of adult smokers out of the 10 largest U.S. cities - 22.4% of adults in Philly smoke. 25.8% of adult smokers are African American, the highest of any racial or ethnic group  o    The high rates of tobacco-use among the LGBTQ and African American communities are due to social stress, discrimination, inadequate healthcare, and Tobacco Industry marketing campaigns, among other social and environmental factors  o   Lung cancer is the second most common cancer in both African-American men and women, but it kills more African Americans than any other type of cancer  o   It is estimated that 30,000 LGBTQ people per year die of smoking-related illnesses, and 45,000 African Americans die from smoking each year. Smoking is the leading cause of preventable death in the United States, killing more people than HIV, illegal drugs, alcohol, firearms, and car accidents combined 

Why smoke-free spaces?

o   Smoke-free spaces protect people from secondhand smoke exposure. There is no safe level of secondhand smoke.  Youth, those with serious medical issues, and the elderly are particularly vulnerable

o   Smoke-free spaces motivate people to quit smoking

o   Smoke-free spaces help smokers reduce their consumption of tobacco

o   Smoke-free spaces help prevent youth from starting to smoke

o   Smoke-free space reduce tobacco-related litter and the risk of fire

o   Smoke-free events are increasingly the norm and expectation at many events in various communities

o   LGBTQ events can be smoke-free and still be welcoming and inclusive.  Many attendees can include youth, families, former smokers, or people in recovery who may prefer for events to be smoke-free

o   Smoke-free spaces acknowledge that tobacco-use has a devastating impact on the wellbeing of LGBTQ people, people of color, and our communities at the intersection of those identities. The Tobacco Industry is no ally to LGBTQ communities and communities of color, and has targeted our communities with tobacco products and strategic marketing for decades

o   In Philadelphia, many public indoor and outdoor spaces are already smoke-free, including many bars, restaurants, workplaces, parks, rec centers, colleges/universities, multi-unit housing, etc.

o   LGBTQ people smoke at rates over 50% higher than non-LGBTQ people, and 16.5% of African Americans in the United States smoke

o   Philadelphia has the highest rate of adult smokers out of the 10 largest U.S. cities - 22.4% of adults in Philly smoke. 25.8% of adult smokers are African American, the highest of any racial or ethnic group

o    The high rates of tobacco-use among the LGBTQ and African American communities are due to social stress, discrimination, inadequate healthcare, and Tobacco Industry marketing campaigns, among other social and environmental factors

o   Lung cancer is the second most common cancer in both African-American men and women, but it kills more African Americans than any other type of cancer

o   It is estimated that 30,000 LGBTQ people per year die of smoking-related illnesses, and 45,000 African Americans die from smoking each year. Smoking is the leading cause of preventable death in the United States, killing more people than HIV, illegal drugs, alcohol, firearms, and car accidents combined